Mobile Lawyer arrives at the ER

imgp0291_2I arrived at work Tuesday, May 4 for an early meeting and found this truck parked outside of my ER in physician only parking.

imgp0292_2Our security staff chased him from the physician parking, but he spent the rest of the day camped on the corner diagonally opposite the ED. I guess it must work or they wouldn’t be doing it.

So this is what has happened to two grand professions in a world where capitalism has triumphed over common sense.

14 thoughts on “Mobile Lawyer arrives at the ER”

  1. All too typical, I’m afraid. I’m an adjuster and I have a case where a father was driving with his two minor children as guest passengers. The dad ran off the road, hit a tree, injuring his children. What to do? Well, an enterprising lawyer came up with the answer: We’ll sue yourself on behalf of your minor children (in order to get to your insurance company) and claim that you were negligent. In essence, the dad is saying, “I’m a moron….give me some money.”

  2. Is it in fact OK for a mobile lawyer’s office to park in front of a fire hydrant?
    Inquiring minds want to know.

  3. All too typical, I’m afraid. I’m an adjuster and I have a case where a father was driving with his two minor children as guest passengers. The dad ran off the road, hit a tree, injuring his children. What to do? Well, an enterprising lawyer came up with the answer: We’ll sue yourself on behalf of your minor children (in order to get to your insurance company) and claim that you were negligent. In essence, the dad is saying, “I’m a moron….give me some money.”

  4. Wow, how repugnant. I went to high school with a fellow who became a personal injury lawyer. He actually thinks he is helping people.
    After many years of nursing, I though I would go to law school because it does pay well. The only drawback is that upon graduation one must be an attorney. What possible need could there be for an old bus with printers and computers. An emergency lawsuit, some sort of living trust emergency. There is no need at all for a mobile lawyer’s office. My God, please turn that thing into a bookmobile and do something positive. This is just sad. A mobile office to raise my car insurance, my malpractice insurance, and my homeowner’s insurance; we really need that.

  5. Since Doctors do not do house calls any more, I am not surprised that they fail to appreciate the virtues of a mobile office.
    Who knows, perhaps the lawyer was helping some physicians out with their estate planning…

  6. It’s called “Taking ambulance chasing to the next level.”
    As if doctors don’t have enough things to worry about. My OB-GYN had to retire and my dad, a practicing OB-GYN came pretty darn close to it b/c of malpractice.
    Lawyers are great when they’re needed, but there’s that tag: “when they’re needed.” I think it’s sick when they advertise their services on TV.
    I’ll shut up now 🙂

  7. When I was in medical school, there was a bus bench across the street from the VA hospital with an ad on it saying “VA malpractice? Call me!” This was printed next to a picture of a smiling lawyer in a suit.
    These lawyers are (mostly) sleazy opportunists. The only problem is, their ads work, because patients often don’t feel that they can be heard any other way. This isn’t always, or even often, the doctor’s fault. In a system where you’re in and out of a doc’s office in ten minutes; where you’re at the mercy of insurance companies who may or may not pay when you need medical attention; when access to basic preventive care is virtually impossible for low-paid service industry workers; in this system the sleazy opportunist lawyers are going to make a killing.
    Sad.

  8. You all have bought the insurance companies bait, hook, line and sinker.
    Insurance companies are the largest single-enterprise contributors to the legislatures in the country. Congress will not institute a patients bill of rights because the insurance lobbies won’t let them.
    Who is the one group that Big Insurance can’t buy off ?? The trial lawyers. Hence, the insurance companies spend millions of dollars on PR with negative attorney propoganda. How do you think the McDonalds verdict became so well known ? A New York PR firm sent out press releases to anyone with a fax machine. They publicize the large verdicts … you never hear the defense verdicts, where corporations that have done wrong get off without paying a dime. Hint …there is a lot more of the later than the former.
    Malpractice ? The states that have imposed liability caps had the insurance premiums INCREASE at a record rate. Why ? Insurance is exempt from anti-trust laws. In other words, they can have a monopoly and control prices, and there is nothing the government can do about it …unlike Microsoft or other companies. Why ? THEY CONTROL CONGRESS !! Congress has allowed them to do this, and if they attempt to change things, they will not be in Congress for long. The only area of our lives insurance companies don’t control is the courtroom and American juries. And this pisses them off. So …. attack the only group that can stand up to them, the evil greedy trial lawyers.
    Someone mentioned the insurance companies denying payment for medical treatment. Imagine you are wrongfully stuck with thousands of dollars in medical bills. Where do you go ? Your congressman ? Nope. Your minister, social worker, neighbor ?? Nothing they can do.
    The one avenue you have is the legal system. Its the only remedy you have. Without this check on their power, there would be no control at all on these companies to steal your money and not pay anything in return. So who is blamed for high insurance rates, pollution, the national debt, bad breath …those greedy lawyers.
    If the lawyers are knocked out of the equation, your premiums won’t go down (its been proven in every state that tried to limit the lawsuits), and you will be at the mercy of the billion dollar insurance companies that will make life and death decisions regarding you or your family, and THERE WOULD NOT BE A DAMN THING YOU COULD DO ABOUT IT.

  9. While I DO think that personal injury lawyers are mud sucking bottom feeders, I have a cousin who became a widow last year because the ER sent her uninsured husband packing with pneumonia and a 103 fever. Yes, they DID check him, and decided he could wait until the free clinic was open — he didn’t live that long.
    The current standard for emergency treatment of the uninsured appears to be “not likely to die in the parking lot if kicked to the curb”.

  10. Chris says,
    “Insurance companies are the largest single-enterprise contributors to the legislatures in the country.”
    Links, please? Because according to the list I have, the top 5 largest lobbying interest groups are: AARP, NRA, National Federation of Independent Businesses, American Israel Public Affairs, and AFL-CIO.
    Health Insurance Association of America is #25.
    “How do you think the McDonalds verdict became so well known ?”
    And the fact that most people think this verdict was ridiculous doesn’t even figure into your view. No, of course not. Once again, do you have any proof of this assertion?
    “The states that have imposed liability caps had the insurance premiums INCREASE at a record rate. Why ? Insurance is exempt from anti-trust laws.”
    Then why are doctors leaving states that DON’T have such a cap? When it’s supposedly cheaper to stay? My god, where did you get this, Democratic Underground?
    “You will be at the mercy of the billion dollar insurance companies that will make life and death decisions regarding you or your family”
    It doesn’t have to be this way. A little insurance reform in the form of states letting more carriers into each state, maybe the additional companies will out-bid each other, and offer cheaper rates. More competitors means lower prices.
    Another mistake in this whole system of ours is that most people have their health insurance through their employers. Which means they don’t pay for it themselves.
    The demand for services, drugs, etc., has gone up, and the supply has stayed flat, therefore driving the price up. How do you fix this? By either increasing supply, or lowering demand. If people had to pay a small chunk when they go to the ER because of a stubbed toe, they won’t go to the ER unless they need to be. Maybe people don’t really NEED Viagra, even though states are forcing insurance companies to pay for these subscriptions.
    I’ve been in the health insurance industry for 15 years, and I don’t see the tinfoil-hat conspiracies that you do. As far as I can tell, it’s government regulation and rules that are a major contributing factor to the health system. If they’d get their hands off, maybe some entrepreneurs would be able to come up with ideas that would help all involved – patients and caregivers.
    TV (Harry)

  11. > In other words, they can have a monopoly and control prices, and there is nothing the government can do about it
    Govt doesn’t have to do anything about it.
    If you really think that insurance rates are too high, start an insurance company and charge less. If you’re correct, you’ll get rich, you’ll drive down insurance rates, and you’ll drive the evil insurance companies out of biz.
    If you’re not willing to do well by doing good, it’s pretty clear that even you don’t believe what you’re saying. Given that, why should anyone else?

  12. Andy Freeman …. I don’t have a clue as to what you are trying to say.
    If you are talking about “competition”, go ahead and try to finance an insurance company that can compete with Cigna, American Medical or State Farm. Make sure you have enough money to pay any potential claims. No problem, the marketplace will solve all of our problems.
    As to “upstart” insurance companies, the ones that start making a profit are typically faced with price-fixing by the more established competition in the companies area of business. For instance, if you issue OB_GYN insurance in Ohio, and there are only 2 or 3 other companies that also do so, the companies can and do fix the premiums to monopolize the business. Any lost money can be made up in other ways (general liability policies etc.) The companies are large enough to absorb the temporary loss to rid themselves of the competition so people like you can cry about your health premiums and blame it on sleazy PI attorneys. This is why the anti-trust exemption is so important. If the companies would be subject to Anti-Trust laws, there would be more competition because such monopolies (and monopolization) would be illegal. The purpose of anti-trust laws are to increase, not decrease, competition.
    Harry, with all due respect, you sound pretty naive. These aren’t conspiracy theories ; this is common knowledge which has been addressed in the Wall Street Journal, NY Times etc., among others.
    Uh, how about a link to the states that deliberately try to limit the number of companies, therefore decreasing competition ? Deregulation would simply allow under-capitalized companies come and go, leaving people with thousands of dollars in medical bills. Who gets hurt by this ? You, me, everyone else who happens to need medical care.
    Your comment about the contributors sounds plausible, but is flawed. Simply put, insurance companies intentionally contribute to a variety of different organizations, such as the AARP, which you have mentioned. The legislators know who is funding the different groups, and the democrats can’t point to a single group to demonize as “Big insurance.” To prove this, I will look for a link I saw recently that showed where and with whom the 5 largest insurance companies contributed. Again, this is public knowledge (as I say before I can find the link(s)).
    Insurance companies, left to their own accord, start coming up with ideas such as “pre-existing limitations”, which essentially means that unless you’ve never had similar problems before in your life, the treatment won’t be covered. The other companies picked up on this, and soon it was boomtime for them, accepting premiums while making questionable denials. (As a disclaimer, my grandmother had skin cancer in the 1960’s ; she redeveloped cancer in 1995. Coverage was denied because it was a pre-existing condition. You might think this is wonderful, but it is very difficult watching your loved-one die when you have to spend more time trying to figure out how the bills would be paid ..particularly when it was based on the pre-existing limitation.)
    In response to the thousands of people without coverage, Congress passed a law regarding prexisting conditions. Yes, regulation, the dire “R” word. The regulation you claim is causing the premiums to increase, along with the people representing insureds who were wrongfully denied coverage. The “R” word is what you are trying to eliminate (“it’s government regulation and rules that are a major contributing factor to the health system”) TV (Harry).
    With regards to Doctors leaving, are you asserting doctors are not leaving states such as California, who have caps/controls ?
    Finally, your ultimate argument is contradictory. On the 1 hand, you believe in deregulation and ther free market when it comes to the actual companies. Fine. On the other hand, you want to regulate and control those individuals who have been harmed by the insurance companies by changing the legal system. What remedy would they have ? Die pennyless ? Picket State Farm ?
    The legal system is made to address worngs (By the way, if you have a dispute about group health insurance coverage issues, it is governed by ERISA, a federal statute that does not allow a trial by jury.) Thank God. Imagine those insurance companies thrown to those runaway juries …
    McDonalds verdict ? OK, where was the publicity when the appellate court reversed (changed) the jury’s award of damages ? This was not publicized, and it shows that there are internal safeguards in the system.
    Harry …do you work as a PR man for these companies ?? It certainly sounds like it.

  13. Parked outside the emergency room…

    …and in the physician-only parking area, no less, this lawyer’s van seen at Brooklyn’s Maimonides Medical Center. (Pics #1 and #2 at EMedConcepts, May 6) (via Gross Anatomy). We wonder about that hydrant in pic…

Comments are closed.